Wednesday, 27 June 2012 By: Jenny Vu

Even More Peacock Spiders

Back in February I interviewed the Peacock Spiderman: Jurgen Otto (can be read here). Today I'm going to revisit Peacock Spiders (Maratus sp.)and show you the photos of the many other species discovered in Australia. The majority of these spiders have only been recently discovered and photographed. Some species still don't have names.

Maratus volans

Source: Jurgen's Flickr
This was the first peacock spider which Jurgen captured it's courtship dance on video. 
This species is found in Sydney.

Read more about this species here:

Maratus harrisi

Source: Jurgen's Flickr
 This species was first photographer by an ametuer photographer, Stuart Harris (known as beeater on flickr). At first he didn't know what the spider was and that it was new to science. With Jurgen's help, they were able to find a specimen in Namadgi National Park, Canberra and was scientifically described. For all his work, this species was therefore named after Harris.

Read more about this species here:
~ Canberra Times article: How amateurs discovered Namadgi's tiny dancer
~ Stuart Harris' original photos: Maratus (peacock spiders)

Maratus linnaei

Source: Jurgen's Flickr
This species lives in Two Peoples Bay Reserve in Western Australia. This species is different from the others since it does not have the abdomen flaps but it still raises and waves its legs.

Check out more photos of this species here.

Maratus mungaich

Source: Jurgen's Flickr
This species is found near Perth in Western Australia.

Check out more photos of this species here.

Maratus amabilis

Source: Jurgen's Flickr
This species is found in Ku-ring-gai Chase National Park near Sydney.

Check out more photos of this species here.

"Darlington's Peacock Spider" Maratus sp.

Source: Jurgen's Flickr
This species is found in the Stirling ranges in Western Australia. They were first collected by Dr Phillip Jackson Darlington in 1931. Where he got his specimans, no one knows but, they have been found on two peaks in the Stirling Ranges. It is believed that since this species is found in a very specific habitat that does not occur anywhere else, this species might be endemic to those two mountain peaks. This could disastrous as the temperature rises and climate changes.

Check out more photos of this species here.
Watch a video about this species here.

Maratus pavonis

Source: Jurgen's Flickr
This is probably the most common and widespread species of the Genus Maratus in Australia. It occurs in Western and Eastern Australia. The specimens photographed by Jurgen were found in Tasmania and Western Australia.
Check out more photos of this species here.

Maratus splendens

Source: Jurgen's Flickr
This species is very cloesly related to Maratus pavonis (above) but does have some differences. This species can be found in areas of Sydney.
Check out more photos of this species here.

Maratus vespetillio

Source: Jurgen's Flickr
This species is widespread in Southern Australia. This species may not be as vibrant as the other but the males actually have contests with one another.
Learn more about this species courtship and male on male contests from this video: Peacock Spdier 3
Check out more photos of this species here.

Other Unidentified Maratus species

From Sydney

Source: Jurgen's Flickr
Source: Jurgen's Flickr
Source: Jurgen's Flickr
From Tasmania

Source: Jurgen's Flickr
I hope you have enjoyed this very lengthy post. As you can see, there can be so much diversity in one genus of spiders and many more peacock spiders probably still to be discovered or named. Thanks again to Jurgen for letting me use his photos. If you want to see more photos of all the spiders Jurgen has photographed, please visit his flickr page. Enjoy!

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